Transgender murders frequently left unresolved

Transgender murders frequently left unresolved

Renata's trans blog photo
Linda DeJesus remembers the last Thanksgiving she had with her daughter, Taja, who cooked for the entire family a few months before she was killed at her apartment complex in San Francisco. (Renata Cló/ News21)

News21 | August 1, 2018

This article was written with News21 fellows Renata Cló and Emma Keith. Transgender victims’ cases are frequently complicated by the circumstances surrounding their deaths, which makes it difficult to classify their homicides as hate crimes. The victims are often killed by a romantic partner, sex work client or stranger.

 

New Orleans remembers Upstairs Lounge fire

New Orleans remembers Upstairs Lounge fire

upstairs lounge cover photo
Attendees file out of St. Mark’s United Methodist Church after the UpStair Lounge fire 45th anniversary interfaith memorial service June 24. (Katie Gagliano/News21)

News21 | July 9, 2018

While not a classified hate crime, the Upstairs Lounge Fire was the largest massacre of LGBTQ individuals pre-Pulse. Thirty-two people died in the fire 45 years ago after an arsonist, believed to be a disgruntled patron of the club, set fire to the stairs. A group of 200 New Orleans residents marched recently so people would remember its importance. Marchers reflected on the blatant LGBTQ discrimination that influenced the city’s response to the blaze.

‘Max Gruver Act’ to strengthen penalties for hazing ‘will save lives,’ his parents say in emotional testimony 

‘Max Gruver Act’ to strengthen penalties for hazing ‘will save lives,’ his parents say in emotional testimony 

Gruver family -- Bill Feig
In the House Criminal Justice Committee, as Stephen Gruver watches, left, Rae Ann Gruver wipes a tear from her eye while testifying on HB78 by Rep. Nancy Landry, R-Lafayette, right, which is a bill to increase criminal penalties for hazing related to the death of Max Gruver at LSU Wednesday, March 21, 2018, in Baton Rouge, La. Max Gruver’s photo is in front of the trio. (Bill Feig/The Advocate)

The Advocate | March 21, 2018

Story written with Elizabeth Crisp. LSU freshman Max Gruver died Sep. 14 of acute alcohol intoxication and aspiration following a night of hazing at the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house. Gruver’s parents, Stephen and Rae Ann, testified on behalf of a bill by Rep. Nancy Landry to make hazing a felony offense in Louisiana if a victim dies or suffers serious bodily injury.